Biografie Zhuang Zhou 莊周

tekening Zhuang ZhouIn deze notitie ga ik in op de historische figuur Zhuang Zhou of Meester Zhuang. In een volgende notitie wordt een korte bespreking gegeven van de verschillende tekstlagen die we binnen de Zhuangzi kunnen onderscheiden. De tekst Zhuangzi is in de loop van enkele eeuwen tot stand gekomen en kent meerdere 'auteurs'. Vervolgens geven we een vervolgnotitie een korte geschiedenis van de wijze waarop de tekst tot ons is gekomen: de teksthistorie.

Er is weinig bekend over Zhuang Zhou. Er zijn wel enkele bronnen:

- de verschijning van Meester Zhuang in de Zhuangzi zelf (overzicht volgt nog),
- de Shiji van Sima Qian (14-83 v Chr).
- enkele zinsnedes in de Xunzi

Citaten uit de brontekst

Zhuang Zhou in de Xunzi hst 21

foto Lapland of Zweden

Xunzi Hoofdstuk 21 Undoing Fixations:

In past times, there were guest retainers* who were fixated—such were the pernicious schools. Mozi was fixated on the useful and did not understand the value of good form. Song Xing was fixated on having few desires and did not understand the value of achieving their objects. Shen Dao was fixated on laws and did not understand the value of having worthy people. Shen Buhai was fixated on power and did not understand the value of having wise people. Huizi was fixated on wording and did not understand the value of what is substantial. Zhuangzi was fixated on the Heavenly and did not understand the value of the human.
(Hutton 2014 Xunzi 荀子 The Complete text, p227)

* “Guest retainers” is a term for those who obtained patronage at royal courts and offered assistance to the rulers. This group of people included many whom we might count as philosophers.

Zhuang Zi in de Shiji (hst 63 en 74)

foto Lapland of Zweden

Hoofdstuk 63 memoire 3:

Vertaling Kristofer Schipper:
Meester Zhuang kwam uit Meng, en zijn eigennaam was Zhou. Hij werkte gedurende een zekere tijd als klerk in een laktuin. Hij leefde ten tijde van koning Hui van Liang (370–319 v Chr.) en van koning Xuan van Qi (319–301 v Chr.).
Er was niets dat hij niet bestudeerd had, maar de essentie en de basis van zijn wetenschap lagen toch in de woorden van de Oude Meester. Dat is dan ook de reden dat zijn geschriften, die meer dan honderdduizend karakters tellen, voor het overgrote deel uit allegorieën bestaan.

Hij schreef ‘De oude visser’, ‘Rover Voetpad’ en ‘Koffers openbreken’. Daarin bekritiseert hij de volgelingen van Confucius en maakt hij de methodes van de Oude Meester aanschouwelijk. De verhalen over Meester Gengsang, die in de Woeste Bergen van het noorden woonde, en dergelijke zijn allemaal verzinsels zonder enige realiteit.

Toch was hij zeer bekwaam in het hanteren van argumenten, het gebruik van analogieën en het karakteriseren van situaties. Deze bekwaamheden gebruikte hij om met de confucianisten en de mohisten korte metten te maken, en zelfs de besten onder de geleerden van zijn tijd wisten niet hoe ze zich aan zijn kritiek konden onttrekken. Zijn woorden waren briljant, open, vrij en geheel persoonlijk. Derhalve konden koningen, vorsten en hoogwaardigheidsbekleders niets met hem aanvangen.

Koning Wei van Chu [die regeerde van 339 tot 329 voor onze jaartelling] had gehoord dat Zhuang Zi een wijs man was, en stuurde een afgezant met rijke geschenken om hem uit te nodigen met de belofte hem tot minister te maken. Zhuang Zi barstte in lachen uit en zei tot de gezant: ‘Duizend goudstukken zijn een flinke beloning, en minister zijn is een eervolle positie. Maar hebt u dan nooit naar de stier gekeken die bij het grote hemeloffer geslacht wordt? Gedurende een groot aantal jaren wordt hij vetgemest, hij wordt bedekt met kleden van brokaat, en zo wordt hij naar de grote voorvadertempel geleid. Op dat moment zou hij misschien liever een eenzaam kalfje willen zijn, maar wat wil je? Vooruit! Scheer je weg! Bezoedel me niet! Ik geef er de voorkeur aan om in m’n modderpoel te blijven spelen, in plaats van me door een potentaat in het gareel te laten slaan! Nooit van m’n leven zal ik een ambt aanvaarden, maar altijd fijn blijven doen waar ik zelf zin in heb.' (Schipper 2007 p15-16).

Zie ook Zhuangzi hoofdstuk 32-XII met een vergelijkbaar fragment.

Zie ook de Engelse vertalingen van slotalinea hst 63 en slotalinea 74 (die zijn niet in het Nederlands vertaald)

Hoofdstuk 63 memoire 3:

Vertaling Victor Mair:
Master Chuang was a man of Meng and his given name was Chou. Chou once served as a minor functionary at Lacquer Garden and was a contemporary of King Hui of Liang and King Hsüan of Chi *. There was nothing upon which his learning did not touch, but its essentials derived from the words of the Old Masters. Therefore, his writings, consisting of over a hundred thousand words, for the most part were allegories. He wrote ''An Old Fisherman," "Robber Footpad," and "Ransacking Coffers" to criticize the followers of Confucius and to illustrate the arts of the Old Masters. Chapters such as "The, Wilderness of Jagged" and
"Master Kangsang*" were all empty talk without any substance. Yet his style and diction were skillful and he used allusions and analogies to excoriate the Confucians and the Mohists. Even the most profound scholars of the age could not defend themselves. His words billowed without restraint to please himself. Therefore, from kings and dukes on down, great men could not put him to use.

King Wei of Chu heard that Chuang Chou was a worthy man. He sent a messenger with bountiful gifts to induce him to come and promised to make him a minister. Chuang Chou laughed and said to the messenger of Ch'u, "A thousand gold pieces is great profit and the position of minister is a respectful one, but haven't you seen the sacrificial ox used in the suburban sacrifices? After being fed for several years, it is garbed in patterned embroidery so that it may be led into the great temple. At this point, though it might wish to be
a solitary piglet, how could that be? Go away quickly, sir, do not pollute me! I'd rather enjoy myself playing around in a fetid ditch than be held in bondage by the ruler of a kingdom. I will never take office for as long as I live, for that is what pleases my fancy." (Victor Mair 1994 Wandering on the Way, introductie pag xxxii-xxxiii)

Vertaling Nienhauser:
Chuang Tzu was a native of Meng. His praenomen was Chou. Chou once served as a functionary at Ch'i-yüan in Meng. He was a contemporary of King Hui of Liang (r. *370-335 B.C.) and King Hsüan of Ch'i (r. *342-324 B.C.). There was nothing on which his teaching did not touch, but in their essentials they went back to the words of Lao Tzu. Thus, his works, over 100,000 characters, all consisted of allegories. He wrote "Yü-fu" (The Old Fisherman),"Tao Chih" ( The Bandit Chih), and "Ch'ü-ch'ieh" (Ransacking Baggage) in which he mocked the likes of Confucius and made clear the politics of Lao Tzu. Keng Sang Tzu (Master Keng Sang) from the Wilderness of Wei-lei and others were all fictions without any truth. 1) Yet he was skilled in composing works and turning phrases, in veiled reference and analogy, and with these he flayed the Confucians and Mohists. Even the most profound scholars of the age could not defend themselves. His words billowed and swirled without restraint, to please himself, and so from kings and dukes down, the great men could not utilize him.

King Wei of Ch'u (r. 339-329 B.C.) heard that Chuang Chou was a worthy man. He sent a messenger with lavish gifts to induce him to come and promised him the position of prime minister. Chuang Chou smiled told Ch'u's messenger, "A thousand chin is great profit and a ministership an exalted position, can it be that you have not seen the sacrificial cow used in the suburban sacrifices? After feeding it for several years, it is dressed in figured brocade and sent into the Great Temple. When things have reached this point, though it might wish to become an unintended pig, how could it attain this? Go quickly, sir, do not pollute me. I would rather romp at my own pleasure in a slimy ditch than be held in captivity by the ruler of a state. I won't take office for as long as I live, for that is what pleases my fancy. most" (Nienhauser 1994 The Grand Scribe's Records vol VII p23-24)
* De data zijn door latere geleerden herzien in resp. 369-319 v.Chr. en 319-301 v.Chr.
1) Nienhauser denkt dat deze uitspraak vooral betrekking heeft op de anekdotes in de Zhuangzi over Laozi.
-----
Hoofdstuk 63 memoire 3, laatste alinea:
Vertaling Nienhauser:
His Honor the Grand Scribe says: "The Way that Lao Tzu valued was devoid of all form and reacted to change with inaction, thus when he wrote his words, his rhetoric and terminology were abstruse and difficult to understand. Chuang Tzu abandoned morality and let loose his opinions, but his essence, too, lies mainly in spontaneity. Shen Tzu treated the lowly as befit the lowly, applying this [principle] to relating [official] titles to the reality [of their duties]. Han Tzu snapped his plumb line, cut through to the truth of things, and made clear true from false, but carried cruelty and harshness to extremes, and was lacking in kindness. All of this sprang from the idea of 'the Way and its virtue' but Lao Tzu was the most profound of them all. (Nienhauser 1994 p29)

-----
hst 74 memoire 14, slotalinea:
Excellency Hsün [Xunzi] loathes the government of his troubled time, with lost states and disorderly rulers one following the other, refusing to follow the Great Way and instead laboring at sorcery and spells and believing in omens; he was consumptions of scholars arguing over minutiae, such as people like Zhuang Chou disordering convention with smooth talk. Thus he discoursed on the advantages and disadvantages of the Confucian, Mohist, and Taoist ways of conduct, writing several tens of thousand of characters, and expired. He was then buried in Lan-ling.
(Nienhauser 1994 p 184)

| Chinees |

Chinese tekst

莊子者,蒙人也,名周。周嘗為蒙漆園吏,與梁惠王、齊宣王同時。其學無所不闚,然其要本歸於老子之言。故其著書十餘萬言,大抵率寓言也。作漁父、盜跖、胠篋,以詆訿孔子之徒,以明老子之術。畏累虛、亢桑子之屬,皆空語無事實。然善屬書離辭,指事類情,用剽剝儒、墨,雖當世宿學不能自解免也。其言洸洋自恣以適己,故自王公大人不能器之。(ctext 63-9)

楚威王聞莊周賢,使使厚幣迎之,許以為相。莊周笑謂楚使者曰:「千金,重利;卿相,尊位也。子獨不見郊祭之犧牛乎?養食之數歲,衣以文繡,以入大廟。當是之時,雖欲為孤豚,豈可得乎?子亟去,無污我。我寧游戲污瀆之中自快,無為有國者所羈,終身不仕,以快吾志焉。」(ctext 63-10)

Zhuāngzi zhě, méng rén yě, míng zhōu. Zhōu cháng wèi méng qī yuán lì, yǔ liáng huì wáng, qí xuānwáng tóngshí. Qí xué wú suǒ bù kuī, rán qí yào běn guīyú lǎo zǐ zhī yán. Gù qí zhùshū shí yú wàn yán, dàdǐ lǜ yùyán yě. Zuò yúfù, dào zhí, qū qiè, yǐ dǐ zǐ kǒngzǐ zhī tú, yǐ míng lǎo zǐ zhī shù. Wèi lèi xū, kàng sāng zǐ zhī shǔ, jiē kōng yǔ wú shìshí. Rán shàn shǔ shū lí cí, zhǐ shì lèi qíng, yòng piāo bō rú, mò, suī dāng shì sù xué bùnéng zì jiě miǎn yě. Qí yán guāng yáng zìzì yǐ shì jǐ, gù zì wánggōng dàrén bùnéng qì zhī.(Ctext 9)

chǔ wēi wáng wén zhuāngzhōuxián, shǐ shǐ hòu bì yíng zhī, xǔ yǐwéi xiāng. Zhuāng zhōu xiào wèi chǔ shǐzhě yuē:`Qiānjīn, zhònglì; qīng xiāng, zūn wèi yě. Zi dú bùjiàn jiāo jì zhī xī niú hū? Yǎng shí zhī shù suì, yī yǐ wén xiù, yǐ rù dà miào. Dāng shì zhī shí, suī yù wéi gū tún, qǐkě dé hū? Zi jí qù, wú wū wǒ. Wǒ níng yóuxì wū dú zhī zhōng zì kuài, wúwéi yǒu guó zhě suǒ jī, zhōngshēn bù shì, yǐ kuài wú zhì yān.'(Ctext 10)

-----
太史公曰:老子所貴道,虛無,因應變化於無為,故著書辭稱微妙難識。莊子散道德,放論,要亦歸之自然。申子卑卑,施之於名實。韓子引繩墨,切事情,明是非,其極慘礉少恩。皆原於道德之意,而老子深遠矣。
Tàishǐ gōng yuē: Lǎozi suǒ guì dào, xūwú, yīnyìng biànhuà yú wúwéi, gù zhùshū cí chēng wéimiào nán shí. Zhuāng zǐ sàn dàodé, fàng lùn, yào yì guī zhī zìrán. Shēn zi bēi bēi, shī zhī yú míng shí. Hán zi yǐn shéngmò, qiè shìqíng, míng shìfēi, qí jí cǎn hé shǎo ēn. Jiē yuán yú dàodé zhī yì, ér lǎozi shēnyuǎn yǐ. (ctext 74 - 11)

----
Memoir 74 fragment 11 nienhauser p185
荀卿嫉濁世之政,亡國亂君相屬,不遂大道而營於巫祝,信禨祥,鄙儒小拘,如莊周等又猾稽亂俗,於是推儒、墨、道德之行事興壞,序列著數萬言而卒。因葬蘭陵。

Xún qīng jí zhuóshì zhī zhèng, wángguó luàn jūn xiāng zhǔ, bùsuí dàdào ér yíng yú wū zhù, xìn jī xiáng, bǐ rú xiǎo jū, rú zhuāng zhōu děng yòu huá jī luàn sú, yúshì tuī rú, mò, dàodé zhī xíngshì xīng huài, xù liè zhāo shù wàn yán ér zú. Yīn zàng lán líng.

Notitie

foto Lapland of Zweden

Angus Graham citeert Sima Qian:

Meester Zhuang kwam uit Meng, 1 en zijn eigennaam was Zhou. Hij werkte gedurende een zekere tijd als klerk in een laktuin. Hij leefde ten tijde van koning Hui van Liang (370–319 v Chr.) en van koning Xuan van Qi (319–301 v Chr.).

Er was niets dat hij niet bestudeerd had, maar de essentie en de basis van zijn wetenschap lagen toch in de woorden van de Oude Meester. Dat is dan ook de reden dat zijn geschriften, die meer dan honderdduizend karakters tellen, voor het overgrote deel uit allegorieën bestaan.

Hij schreef ‘De oude visser’, ‘Rover Voetpad’ en ‘Koffers openbreken’. Daarin bekritiseert hij de volgelingen van Confucius en maakt hij de methodes van de Oude Meester aanschouwelijk. De verhalen over Meester Gengsang, die in de Woeste Bergen van het noorden woonde, en dergelijke zijn allemaal verzinsels zonder enige realiteit.
Toch was hij zeer bekwaam in het hanteren van argumenten, het gebruik van analogieën en het karakteriseren van situaties. Deze bekwaamheden gebruikte hij om met de confucianisten en de mohisten korte metten te maken, en zelfs de besten onder de geleerden van zijn tijd wisten niet hoe ze zich aan zijn kritiek konden onttrekken. Zijn woorden waren briljant, open, vrij en geheel persoonlijk. Derhalve konden koningen, vorsten en hoogwaardigheidsbekleders niets met hem aanvangen.

Angus Graham geeft in zijn vertaling van de Zhuangzi een overzicht van alle vindplaatsen van Meester Zhuang in de tekst Zhuangzi (Graham 2001 p117-124). Op basis daarvan probeert hij een biografische schets van Meester Zhuang te geven:

His upbringing was probably Confucian 2, but he studied under a Yangist, and in due course became a qualified Yangist teacher with his own disciples. After a crisis which may be reflected in the Tiao-ling story he went his own way, as the irreverent drop-out of the more characteristic tales.
He visited Hui Shih, and heard him use the paradoxes of space and time to prove that all things are one; but his attitude hardened against logic, and he discovered in his own ecstatic experiences the vision which dissolves all distinctions, above all the dichotomy of life and death.
He never again became a formal teacher – in one story he is weaving sandals for a living – and such disciples as he had were people who hung around to pick up something from his words or his mere presence, like the retinue of Wang T’ai of the chopped foot at the beginning of ‘The signs of fullness of Power’. All this is speculation, but will do to make a frame on which to arrange the stories, starting from the Tiao-ling crisis and ending on his deathbed." (Graham 2001, p117).

Kristofer Schipper stelt: 'Laten we aannemen dat er inderdaad een zekere Zhuang Zhou bestaan heeft, dat hij een klerk -en dus een geletterde- was die verbonden was aan een gilde van handwerkers in een lakplantage in de buurt van de grote handelsstad Tao' (Schipper 2007 p30).

Esther Klein voegt daar aan toe: "Apart from the Zhuangzi text, and especially its inner chapters, Master Zhuang has almost no existence as an independent historical figure. He is defined by his authorship of the Zhuangzi text (or at least its perceived core, the inner chapters). To use the terminology of literary criticism, he is purely an author-function. In making the distinction between author and author-function, Michel Foucault wrote:

This ‘author-function’ … is not formed spontaneously through the simple attribution of a discourse to an individual. It results from a complex operation whose purpose is to construct the rational entity we call an author …We speak of an individual’s ‘profundity’ or ‘creative’ power, his intentions or the original inspiration manifested in writing. Nevertheless, these aspects of an individual, whom we designate as an author (or which comprise an individual as an author), are projections, in terms always more or less psychological, of our way of handling texts (Esther Klein 2011 p 307).

Mark Edward Lewis geeft een vergelijkbare waarschuwing:

"the notion of authorship was weak or absent” in Warring States philosophical texts. The figure of the master, around whom an intellectual tradition would coalesce, was not an author figure. Instead, “the master was invented, or written as a character, in the text dedicated to him.” (Mark Edward Lewis 1999 Writing and Authority in Early China p58 geciteerd in Klein 2011 p314)

Tot slot. Zhuangzi was een tijdgenoot van Kongzi (Mencius). Er is geen aanwijzing dat deze twee elkaar hebben ontmoet. 

Noten

1. De plaats Meng lag in de kleine staat Song (hedendaags Henan en Shandong). Zie verder Schipper 2007 p17-22.
Karel van der Leeuw schrijft dat hoewel Zhuangzi afkomstig is uit een van de centrale staten (Song), zijn denken en schrijfstijl meer verwantschap tonen met de traditie van de zuidelijke staat Chu. Deze staat gold als barbaars. De staat Song zou het best de tradities van de Chang-dynastie hebben bewaard. De inwoners ervan golden destijds als dom. (Karel van der Leeuw, 1994 p72).

Arthur Waley ziet een verwantschap tussen de Zhuangzi en de Chu CI 楚辭 [Ch'u Tz'u], de 'Verses of Chu' of 'Songs of Chu':
To the south lay Ch'u, a land with a literature and culture of its own. Chuang Tzu was not actually a
man of Ch'u. But his native State Sung stood in close relationship with Ch'u, and parallels between
Chuang Tzu and the works of the great Ch'u poet, Ch'ii Yuan, have often been pointed out. (Waley 1956 Three ways of thought in Ancient China, p 60)

Zie voor de Chuci: klassiekchineseteksten.nl Chu ci

2.
De mogelijkheid dat Zhuang Zhou beïnvloed is door het confuciansitische denken wordt ook geopperd door Guo Moruo (1892-1978). Guo’s veronderstelling is dat Zhuangzi een student was van de Yan Hui tak.
(Guo, “Zhuangzi de pipan,” in Guo Moruo quanji, Lishi bian, vol. 2 (Beijing: Renmin, 1982), pp. 188-
212 geciteerd in Scott Cook (1997) Zhuang Zi and His Carving of the Confucian Ox, Philosophy East and West, Vol. 47, No. 4 p. 521. De Yan Hui tak is een van de acht Confucianistische takken die genoemde worden in de Han Feizi, hst Xianxue. Scott Cook tekent hierbij aan "There is probably not enough evidence to regard Guo's thesis as anything more than an interesting piece of speculation".

Literatuur

Boeken 1 tot 3 van de 3

GRAHAM, Angus Charles (2001). Chuang-tzu: The inner chapters, 2001 (Engels)
Oorspr titel Chuang-Tzu: The Seven ""inner chapters" and Other Writings from the Book Chuang Tzu. Allen and Unwin 1981 De vertaling bevat ongeveer 80 procent van de overgeleverde zhuangzi. *

KLEIN, Esther (2011). Were there “Inner Chapters” in the Warring States?: A New Examination of Evidence about the Zhuangzi  IN: T'Oung Pao, 2011 No. 96 Issue 4 pp 29. (Engels) online *

LEWIS, Mark Edward (1999). Writing and authority in early China, 1999 (Engels)
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-4114-5ISBN: 9780791441145 *

Boeken 1 tot 3 van de 3


colofon | cookies | afkortingen en iconen